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09.03.2017

Applications Open for ICCROM Stone Course 2017

ICCROM's 20th International Course on Stone Conservation will be taking place in Mexico from 9 October to 8 December 2017

The primary goal of the course is to improve the practice of stone conservation internationally by providing participants with a holistic understanding of the decay and deterioration of stone, disseminating effective conservation methodologies, and ensuring a practical understanding of appropriate repair methods and long-term management strategies.
ICCROM is interested in inviting applications from mid-career professionals and other decision makers in conservation, with at least five years of practical working experience in the field, from different disciplines (archaeologists, architects, conservator-restorers, conservation scientists, engineers and other professionals involved in stone conservation).

Course objectives and programme

The course adopts a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach and is designed for professionals involved in the conservation of historic stone structures and artifacts. The primary goal of the course is to improve the practice of stone conservation internationally by providing participants with a holistic understanding of the decay and deterioration of stone, disseminating effective conservation methodologies, and ensuring a practical understanding of appropriate repair methods and long-term management strategies. Through lectures, discussions, laboratory sessions, demonstrations, site visits and field exercises, participants will discuss both the fundamental theories of conservation as well as consider how advances in technology and research have influenced practical approaches as they pertain to all phases of stone conservation. Group fieldwork exercises at a worksite will provide participants with the opportunity to address actual work scenarios where multidisciplinary solutions and collaboration are required. Throughout the course, participants will be encouraged to draw upon their collective expertise from various specializations to help them arrive at more effective conservation solutions.

The course will take place over eight weeks; four weeks in Mexico City and four weeks at the Mayan archaeological site Chicanná, in the State of Campeche. The training activities will include topics such as:

  • Conservation principles and theories;
  • Stone heritage in Mexico: formal, material and technical/constructive characteristics
  • Material sciences as a tool for identification, analysis, and design of conservation treatments;
  • Mechanisms of deterioration;
  • Diagnostic techniques for identifying causes and effects of observed conditions;
  • Condition assessment methodology;
  • Documentation
  • Developing a conservation strategy for immediate and long-term actions including prevention, maintenance, repair and treatment; and
  • Managing stone conservation projects and the value of working within multidisciplinary teams

Participants
The course is designed for a maximum of 20 participants. The course is open to archaeologists, architects, conservator-restorers, conservation scientists, engineers and other professionals involved in stone conservation, preferably with at least five years of practical working experience in the field.
Preference will be given to heritage conservation professionals in the public sector, teachers involved in the practical training of conservation professionals, and those in a position to disseminate and leverage the knowledge gained during the course to a wider audience. The participants will be selected from international conservation professionals.

Course fee: 900 € (Euro)

Applications must be received by ICCROM by 30 April 2017 to ensure inclusion in the selection process.

More information can be found on the ICCROM website

Lead Image: Eagle Relief in Stone / Public Domain

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