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16.03.2017

HLF Announces Funding for Heritage Skills

The Heritage Lottery Fund is investing £10.1million across the UK to address the critical shortages in heritage skills

18 Projects have been chosen to help train a new and more diverse generation of skilled workers, including heritage craftspeople. There is an especially strong focus on drawing people from a wide range of backgrounds, including those who have never considered careers in heritage before. For example, there will be opportunities for ex-servicemen training as dry stone wallers, young novices working on historic ships and women training as steam boiler engineers.

Sir Peter Luff, Chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), said: “There is no quick fix to this problem. The heritage sector has been slow in widening the profile of its workforce and as a consequence is on a long-term learning curve. Existing targeted skills funding has contributed more than £47million to date. “It’s simple yet highly effective: trainees paired with experts gain access to knowledge plus practical, paid, on-the-job experience.”

Tracey Crouch, Heritage Minister, said: “Investing in new heritage talent will ensure we build a more sustainable sector, protect our treasured history and continue to attract visitors from across the globe.  

Among the successful applicants are:

  • Colchester and Ipswich Museum Service which will go towards the ‘Transforming People to Transform Museums’ project.
  • Culture&: The New Museum School, London which will include training in conservation, collections management, digitisation and public engagement. Priority candidates will be under 25, from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds, or from lower socio-economic groups.
  • Museums Galleries Scotland: Skills for Success, which aims to provide museum-based traineeships across Scotland for non-graduates.

For more information, visit the Heritage Lottery Fund website.

Lead Image: Angel of the North; David Wilson Clarke / Creative Commons

 

 

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